Articles

Antibodies, Vaccines and Sera


Vaccines are products made up of dead or attenuated (weakened) microorganisms or toxins produced by these inactivated microorganisms in the laboratory.

Thus, vaccines contain antigens that are incapable of causing the disease but capable of inducing our bodies to produce antibodies. Thus, if the individual, after vaccination, comes into contact with these microorganisms, the body will already have enough antibodies for its defense. .

It is important that all children be vaccinated according to medical recommendations. Vaccines against many diseases such as tuberculosis, tetanus, diphtheria, whooping cough, measles and childhood paralysis are given at health clinics. Parents need to bring their children to get the vaccines at the right time. When taken properly, vaccines immunize the person against the diseases for which they are intended.

However, a person's body can be invaded by a microorganism against which it is not yet protected. Suppose the action of this microorganism is rapid and devastating and the person does not have the time to make antibodies. In this case, the person must receive the therapeutic serum, which already contains the antibodies needed to inactivate the antigens.

Modern science has therapeutic serums against the action of toxins produced by certain microorganisms (eg anti-tetanus serum, which fights tetanus, a disease caused by a type of bacteria), and also against toxins present in the venom of certain animals, such as venomous snakes (anti-acid serum). Thus, while vaccines contain antigens and induce the body to produce antibodies, the sera already contain ready antibodies. Vaccines, thanks to “memory cells”Which can guarantee lasting immunity; Serums cure the disease, providing quick but temporary protection.